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Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary

Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary is a top #20 on iTunes, biz! Join #1 National Bestselling Author of ON FIRE & Inspirational Speaker John O'Leary and wake up from accidental living so you can do, be, achieve and impact more through your life. More simply said, so you can: Live Inspired. ­­Each episode features an amazing guest who will share his/her story, successes, failures, lessons and life to help you uncover tips to apply in yours. Subscribe now so you can join John on a new episode every Thursday! Until then: Today is your day. Live Inspired.
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Now displaying: March, 2018
Mar 29, 2018

"Don't stand by, stand UP."

Sue McCollum is the Chairman and CEO of Major Brands, Inc., an 80-year-old, family-run operation and the only liquor distributor in the U.S. run by a woman. But it wasn't Sue's dream to run a large operation.

Her husband, Todd, was planning to run the company his grandfather founded and one day - pass it on to his children. Needless to say, plans changed after Todd was diagnosed with brain cancer. Sue, in short, "stepped up."

Almost immediately after Todd's passing, Sue was labeled "Liqueur Widow" by competitors and the press as long-time clients were pulling out of agreements. 

Sue will show us that it's possible to not only fight back, but do so honorably. And that you can run a successful business based on strong values.

My friends, join me and Sue to learn how to harness resilience, overcome adversity and live inspired.

SHOW NOTES: 

  • "One day can bend your life."
    • October 4, 2010 bent Sue's life. Her husband, Todd, had a seizure, which lead to a cancer diagnosis and a year to live.
  • Todd was determined to not let his death be the end of his family's business...or his story. While being treated, he had a quilt made from all of his neckties. His watches were engraved for graduations and other special occasions to give to his sons. In his last year, Todd enjoyed planning his memorial service.
  • Soon after Todd's death, two companies terminated business with Major Brands with no cause. Sue remembers asking herself, "Am I going to fight for this company or not?" 
  • After winning in multiple court cases, Major Brands, Inc. did three things: Established a new scholarship in Todd's name, established a family emergency fund for employees, & gave all associates a loyalty award of $3,000.
  • "We only know our lives looking backward." 

SUE McCOLLUM'S LIVE INSPIRED 7 

1. What is the best book you’ve ever read? North Toward Home

2. Tomorrow you discover your wealthy uncle shockingly dies at the age of 103; leaving you millions. What would you do with it? I would set up a foundation. I would begin to solve, from a research perspective, how we provide better education and opportunities for people who didn't have what I had.

3. Your house is on fire, all living things and people are out. You have the opportunity to run in and grab one item. What would it be? There is a photograph of my sons. I would grab it. 

4. You are sitting on a bench overlooking a gorgeous beach. You have the opportunity to have a long conversation with anyone living or dead. Who would it be? Marv Levy.

5. What is the best advice you’ve ever received? It came from my second boss, my first woman boss. "Sue, don't beat yourself up. Others will do that for you. Never do it to yourself."

6. Looking back, what advice would you give yourself at age 20? Take more risks. Be a badass.

7. It’s been said that all great people can have their lives summed up in one sentence. How do you want yours to read? I tried hard. 

*** 

If you enjoyed today’s episode: Subscribe (automatically get new episodes), rate & review (help spread the word!) this podcast wherever you get your podcasts.

I can’t wait to see you here next Thursday! Today is your day. Live Inspired.

Live Inspired with John every day on FacebookTwitterYouTubeLinkedInPinterest, Instagram and get his Monday Motivation email: www.JohnOLearyInspires.com/Monday-Morning

Mar 22, 2018

"We see the world as we think it is. Not as it really is. Wear glasses that work."

Todd Davis has spent 20+ years "looking for the right people." As Chief People Officer at FranklinCovey, a training company, he is an expert at identifying how human behaviors impact our life, our work and our output. His new book, Get Better: 15 Proven Practices to Build Effective Relationships at Work shares that the key to improving our effectiveness is found in improving our behaviors.

Todd's insights shine a light on the truth that an organization's greatest assets are undoubtedly its people and remind us that leadership is a decision, not a position. 

This conversation is a journey in self-awareness. Join Todd and me for a great conversation and practical ways to fine-tune your behaviors so that you can live and work inspired.

SHOW NOTES: 

TODD DAVIS'S LIVE INSPIRED 7 

1. What is the best book you’ve ever read? Where the Red Fern Grows when I was a kid. Two others: The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell and The Linchpin by Seth Godin. 

2. Tomorrow you discover your wealthy uncle shockingly dies at the age of 103; leaving you millions. What would you do with it?  I would take it all down to Puerto Rico right now and help out.

3. Your house is on fire, all living things and people are out. You have the opportunity to run in and grab one item. What would it be? Many years ago I would say pictures. On Christmas, our family spends an hour or two writing letters to each other before opening presents. I'd grab those. 

4. You are sitting on a bench overlooking a gorgeous beach. You have the opportunity to have a long conversation with anyone living or dead. Who would it be?  Mother Theresa and Gandhi. 

5. What is the best advice you’ve ever received? 

6. Looking back, what advice would you give yourself at age 20? To believe in myself.

7. It’s been said that all great people can have their lives summed up in one sentence. How do you want yours to read? He who dies with the most meaningful relationships wins.  

*** 

If you enjoyed today’s episode: Subscribe (automatically get new episodes), rate & review (help spread the word!) this podcast wherever you get your podcasts.

I can’t wait to see you here next Thursday! Today is your day. Live Inspired.

Live Inspired with John every day on FacebookTwitterYouTubeLinkedInPinterest, Instagram and get his Monday Motivation email: www.JohnOLearyInspires.com/Monday-Morning

Mar 15, 2018

"This process of accepting that your loved one has hurt other people. And accepting who that is and what it means to be a mother of someone like that, it takes not only months but years."

Sue Klebold is forever tied to a tragic day marked down in American history, April 20, 1999. It was on that day two gunmen entered Columbine High School and killed 12 students, a teacher and wounded two dozen others. One of the shooters was her son, Dylan.

After an excruciating journey, Sue has come to a place of peace and is using her life to honor the lives of those who died, raise awareness for mental health issues and do what she could to prevent another tragedy like Columbine from happening again.

Sue shares her story of a mother's love, heart-wrenching tragedy, sincere appeal for forgiveness, the long process of allowing herself to grieve, and letting go of the trauma of being hated, criticized and judged in order to focus on her heart, and the little boy she lost and adored. 

Today Sue bravely, honestly and with great humility shares her 20-year journey of researching mental health, suicide, and their ramifications so that we as a community may be able to live more inspired. I think what will amaze you most is how much you can relate to Sue, her family and her story. Sue shares concrete ideas to make sure none of us have to step into her shoes. It is a podcast you won't want to miss.

SHOW NOTES: 

  • Sue heard on the news that 25 had died and found herself praying that no more would die and if her son was the killer that he'd kill himself to stop the number of fatalities from growing.
  • "I didn't think of him as a vicious murderer."
  • "I went into the meeting with the sheriff thinking he'd been brainwashed or tricked. But I was shown what really happened and his level of involvement in the planning that I was in a state of shock all over again. I had to rebuild who Dylan was to me."
  • We were very isolated after the tragedy, I had a tremendous amount of humiliation to think that someone I loved and raised could do something like this. There was a lot of fear involved. 
  • "Everybody who knew Dylan was as dumbfounded as we were. All wondering what we could have said to change his involvement...trying to understand what Dylan had done, look out for each other."
  • I remember Dylan with joy. Like if he died of cancer or a car accident. 
    • I thought I'd never get to this place. I thought the way in which he died would obliterate what he had meant to me.
  • Every time I saw kids with their moms and kids with their siblings I thought Dylan took that from people. I tried to make statements, write letters to the victims..."There is nothing you can do to adequately apologize for something like that." Read paralyzed Columbine survivor, Anne Marie Hochhalter's letter of forgiveness to Sue.  
  • "I had perceived myself to be a good mother." "Previously, I had been one of those mothers who when crimes were being committed, went "uh-huh, what kinda parent was that."
  • People had to think of me as a bad parent or different than them because "The thought that you could do your best and be a good parent and this could still happen is a terrifying thought."
  • "I had no idea during his lifetime that he was in danger and that's why I speak about this a lot today. Now I look back - after being educated, reading, talking with experts - I can say that was a potential sign. But I didn't have the knowledge at the time."
    • School counselors, therapist, teachers and his parents all missed potential signs. He said he'd show us that he was on the right track and he did. He worked, applied to college and did well for the next 14 months.
    • Change in behavior happened his junior year. Changes in his sleep patterns. But he presented as a normal person.  
  • "The thought that you could do your best and be a good parent and this could still happen is terrifying." 
  • "Important point to remember about mental health: What we think people should be feeling and what they are feeling can be very, very different."
  • We need to do everything we can to truly understand what our children are going through. Ask open-ended questions (even though you can't be certain they'll answer truthfully):
    • "Tell me something about yourself that no one understands, but that causes you pain?"
    • Instead of trying to fix it, making your child feel like he has to "be happy" ... no matter their answer, your response should always be, "tell me more about that."
      • Ask the hard questions: Do you have thoughts about hurting yourself or someone else? Stay calm, don't try to argue with that person.
        • I wish I'd given more of an opportunity to share more of what he was dealing with and that whatever his feelings were okay. If I could do anything over, those are the things I would make happen.
  • Sue's book is a meditation on forgiveness A Mother's Reckoning. 
  • There is a physiological difference in those who commit suicide; when someone is having persistent thoughts of suicide and can't shut it off - these are symptoms of a physiological brain malfunction. [Dr. Victoria Arango, Ph.D. from Columbia University] 
  • According to the FBI, of mass shootings, 78% of them the shooter was suicidal. This is why I have become so focused on suicide prevention. If we can get someone away from a suicidal crisis, it gives us great opportunity to prevent a shooting like this from escalating.
  • "I practice gratitude a lot." I go to bed at night counting blessings to adjust my mind into a positive place.
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-talk or go to their website to chathttps://suicidepreventionlifeline.org 
  • All author proceeds from A Mother’s Reckoning are being donated to various mental health charities, including Mental Health America (MHA), National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP), American Association of Suicidology (AAS), and Brain & Behavior Research Foundation.

SUE KLEBOLD'S LIVE INSPIRED 7 

1. What is the best book you’ve ever read? Oh, that's a great question, I wish I had a long time to think about that. Gone with the Wind, Amy Tann, one of the best books on suicide: No Time to Say Goodbye.

2. Tomorrow you discover your wealthy uncle shockingly dies at the age of 103; leaving you millions. What would you do with it? Well, I think I'd sit on it for a while. I don't think there is anything different that I would do from what I am doing. I try to live a life where I have donated what I can donate from my book. I would want to make sure that money was used well. I am so happy with how my life is. 

3. Your house is on fire, all living things and people are out. You have the opportunity to run in and grab one item. What would it be? I think I would grab pictures of my children.

4. You are sitting on a bench overlooking a gorgeous beach. You have the opportunity to have a long conversation with anyone living or dead. Who would it be? Dylan. 

5. What is the best advice you’ve ever received? It was in the process of my therapy, where I was allowed to grieve. 

6. Looking back, what advice would you give yourself at age 20? You are in for a wild ride. Nothing you can do is going to prepare yourself. You are more courageous and strong than you have any idea.

7. It’s been said that all great people can have their lives summed up in one sentence. How do you want yours to read? She did the best she could. 

*** 

If you enjoyed today’s episode: Subscribe (automatically get new episodes), rate & review (help spread the word!) this podcast wherever you get your podcasts.

I can’t wait to see you here next Thursday! Today is your day. Live Inspired.

Live Inspired with John every day on FacebookTwitterYouTubeLinkedInPinterest, Instagram and get his Monday Motivation email: www.JohnOLearyInspires.com/Monday-Morning

Mar 8, 2018

"Leverage faith over doubt. Those praying over me had an inch more faith than they did doubt."

Joel Boggess is the bestselling author of Finding Your Voicehost of the incredibly popular podcast the ReLaunch Show, and a motivational speaker bringing his message of never giving up and using action in the face of fear to his audience.

At the age of 5, Joel suffered a devastating accident; falling 30 feet resulted in a tremendous amount of blood loss and a fractured skull, and Joel spent more than four weeks in a coma. In an instant, Joel's life went from "happy-go-lucky" to an immense daily struggle and a long road to recovery. The injury left him with hearing problems and difficulty with memory, yet it taught Joel that some lessons are learned on the playground, the boardroom, or even a recovery room. 

Joel's insights into how action can be the greatest weapon to conquering fear will motivate you and inspire you to never back down.

Today Joel shares how one action can make life better. 

SHOW NOTES: 

  • Joel is the author of Finding Your Voice
  • He started on the radio 25 years ago. He said the transition to podcasting was a "no-brainer."
  • His ReLaunch Show podcast has over 1.7 million downloads.
  • At the age of 5 in San Antonio, Texas, Joel drifted away from his group and climbed up what he thought was monkey bars; it was actually a train bridge.
  • He fell 30 feet to the rocks below. The paramedics were unable to find a vein because he had lost so much blood. He had a triple skull fracture resulting in a four-week coma. 
  • His parents were told, "don't expect Joel to live a normal life."
  • "Faith doesn't grow in a vacuum"
  • In 2017, Joel launched his professional speaking career.
  • You can listen to Joel's Podcast here

JOEL BOGGESS'S LIVE INSPIRED 7 

1. What is the best book you’ve ever read? The Bible, particularly The Book of Proverbs. Also, The Power of Positive Thinking by Norman Miller Peale.

2. Tomorrow you discover your wealthy uncle shockingly dies at the age of 103; leaving you millions. What would you do with it? After everyone is taken care of- wife, parents, in-laws- I would do something for dog rescue. My wife and I have always had dogs. Perhaps buy a property and make a facility for dogs. 

3. Your house is on fire, all living things and people are out. You have the opportunity to run in and grab one item. What would it be? 

4. You are sitting on a bench overlooking a gorgeous beach. You have the opportunity to have a long conversation with anyone living or dead. Who would it be? One grandfather sitting on each side of me. Both my grandfathers have passed. I didn't get as much information from them that I needed to. 

5. What is the best advice you’ve ever received? Joe Callaway gave me this information four or five years ago; he said, "don't be cute, be clear." 

6. Looking back, what advice would you give yourself at age 20? Put the beer down. Drinking was something that I leaned on a lot.

7. It’s been said that all great people can have their lives summed up in one sentence. How do you want yours to read? Joel was a guy who just wouldn't give up. 

*** 

If you enjoyed today’s episode: Subscribe (automatically get new episodes), rate & review (help spread the word!) this podcast wherever you get your podcasts.

I can’t wait to see you here next Thursday! Today is your day. Live Inspired.

Live Inspired with John every day on FacebookTwitterYouTubeLinkedInPinterest, Instagram and get his Monday Motivation email: www.JohnOLearyInspires.com/Monday-Morning

Mar 1, 2018

"I feel like a lot of us are going through a dark time. That we are living under clouds and need the sun to come out. I hope I'm the person holding the umbrella. I hope I am the person who can tell you to come under the umbrella 'til the sun comes out."

Lizzie Velasquez is a globally recognized motivational speaker, a presenter at TEDx, champion of anti-bullying, author, producer and all around amazing individual. 

At the time of Lizzie's birth, she was one of only three people in the world diagnosed with Marfanoid–Progeroid–Lipodystrophy Syndrome: a condition which doesn't allow her to gain weight and affects her heart, eyes, and bones. At age 17, she came across a YouTube video entitled "World's Ugliest Woman"- only to discover that it was about her. In the years since then, she's made it her life's work to spread kindness and stand up for bullying victims.

She has appeared on The Today Show, The View, AOL, MSN, Yahoo, The Huffington Post, Katie Couric and her TEDx video has been viewed over 13 million times. She has inspired people around the world to look at inner beauty, to be kind to each other, and to own our emotions. 

Today she beautifully articulates her story of strength, determination, and "what's next" with us. 

SHOW NOTES: 

  • She was born in Austin, Texas and still lives there today. To her, it is home.
  • Her parents raised her as a normal kid. It wasn't until kindergarten that she realized for the first time there was something different about her.
  • "I see anything that I want to do as a dare."
  • Her TEDx Talk "How Do YOU Define Yourself" has been viewed over 13 million times. You can watch it here.
  • "The humor I have onstage is the same humor I have off."
  • Referring to bullying, Lizzie says "It happens to absolutely everyone." Her advice: "You got this, it isn't going to be easy, but you can do it."
  • She prioritizes sitting for 5-10 minutes in "me time" with no interruptions, cell phone, etc. 
  • Her newest book is called, Dare to be Kind.
  • Lizzie has over 1.5 million people following her on Social Media. Follow her at @littlelizziev

LIZZIE VELASQUEZ'S LIVE INSPIRED 7 

1. What is the best book you’ve ever read? Wonder.

2. Tomorrow you discover your wealthy uncle shockingly dies at the age of 103; leaving you millions. What would you do with it? I have always had this dream of creating a scholarship foundation, then I would help my church and family. Lastly, I would spoil my dogs. 

3. Your house is on fire, all living things and people are out. You have the opportunity to run in and grab one item. What would it be? The big box of photos I have. 

4. You are sitting on a bench overlooking a gorgeous beach. You have the opportunity to have a long conversation with anyone living or dead. Who would it be? Julia Roberts or Ava Duvernay.

5. What is the best advice you’ve ever received? Never be scared to learn. Be comfortable in the uncomfortable.

6. Looking back, what advice would you give yourself at age 20? Prepare for some craziness. 

7. It’s been said that all great people can have their lives summed up in one sentence. How do you want yours to read? Go out every day, knowing it isn't going to always be sunny. But, it will clear up. 

*** 

If you enjoyed today’s episode: Subscribe (automatically get new episodes), rate & review (help spread the word!) this podcast wherever you get your podcasts.

I can’t wait to see you here next Thursday! Today is your day. Live Inspired.

Live Inspired with John every day on FacebookTwitterYouTubeLinkedInPinterest, Instagram and get his Monday Motivation email: www.JohnOLearyInspires.com/Monday-Morning

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